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Jaguar, 2015

Jaguar, 2015

The Mayans believed that death was followed by a perilous voyage of the soul through the underworld, populated by sinister gods. Heaven was reserved only for those who had been sacrificed or died in childbirth. In Mexican Catholic religion it is thought that the soul, once it leaves the body, enters an ambiguous state of limbo where it is at the mercy of those who are still alive. The loved ones of the deceased are then responsible to pray for their safe passage through purgatory to be purified and granted entrance into heaven. Most often in Mexican culture a person’s passing does not mean that their soul has expired as well. 

 

Last fall I attended a month long production residency with Arquetopia Foundation For The Arts(Puebla, MX). I travelled three thousand kilometres by bus and car through central and southern Mexico to learn how it’s people understand death. There, sacrificial offerings, cleansing rituals, and elaborate altars in private homes are all a means of discussing one’s passing and connecting with loved ones already gone. The specimens I photographed during my time there serve a similar purpose. They are vessels for contemplation of the afterlife to help us better grasp what lies on the other side. 

 

This is the beginning of a body of work that was photographed at the Museum of Natural History in Puebla, Mexico where I was generously granted access to their immense taxidermy collection.

 

Horned Deer, 2015

Horned Deer, 2015

The Mayans believed that death was followed by a perilous voyage of the soul through the underworld, populated by sinister gods. Heaven was reserved only for those who had been sacrificed or died in childbirth. In Mexican Catholic religion it is thought that the soul, once it leaves the body, enters an ambiguous state of limbo where it is at the mercy of those who are still alive. The loved ones of the deceased are then responsible to pray for their safe passage through purgatory to be purified and granted entrance into heaven. Most often in Mexican culture a person’s passing does not mean that their soul has expired as well. 

 

Last fall I attended a month long production residency with Arquetopia Foundation For The Arts(Puebla, MX). I travelled three thousand kilometres by bus and car through central and southern Mexico to learn how it’s people understand death. There, sacrificial offerings, cleansing rituals, and elaborate altars in private homes are all a means of discussing one’s passing and connecting with loved ones already gone. The specimens I photographed during my time there serve a similar purpose. They are vessels for contemplation of the afterlife to help us better grasp what lies on the other side. 

 

This is the beginning of a body of work that was photographed at the Museum of Natural History in Puebla, Mexico where I was generously granted access to their immense taxidermy collection.

 

Jaguar, 2015

The Mayans believed that death was followed by a perilous voyage of the soul through the underworld, populated by sinister gods. Heaven was reserved only for those who had been sacrificed or died in childbirth. In Mexican Catholic religion it is thought that the soul, once it leaves the body, enters an ambiguous state of limbo where it is at the mercy of those who are still alive. The loved ones of the deceased are then responsible to pray for their safe passage through purgatory to be purified and granted entrance into heaven. Most often in Mexican culture a person’s passing does not mean that their soul has expired as well. 

 

Last fall I attended a month long production residency with Arquetopia Foundation For The Arts(Puebla, MX). I travelled three thousand kilometres by bus and car through central and southern Mexico to learn how it’s people understand death. There, sacrificial offerings, cleansing rituals, and elaborate altars in private homes are all a means of discussing one’s passing and connecting with loved ones already gone. The specimens I photographed during my time there serve a similar purpose. They are vessels for contemplation of the afterlife to help us better grasp what lies on the other side. 

 

This is the beginning of a body of work that was photographed at the Museum of Natural History in Puebla, Mexico where I was generously granted access to their immense taxidermy collection.

 

Horned Deer, 2015

The Mayans believed that death was followed by a perilous voyage of the soul through the underworld, populated by sinister gods. Heaven was reserved only for those who had been sacrificed or died in childbirth. In Mexican Catholic religion it is thought that the soul, once it leaves the body, enters an ambiguous state of limbo where it is at the mercy of those who are still alive. The loved ones of the deceased are then responsible to pray for their safe passage through purgatory to be purified and granted entrance into heaven. Most often in Mexican culture a person’s passing does not mean that their soul has expired as well. 

 

Last fall I attended a month long production residency with Arquetopia Foundation For The Arts(Puebla, MX). I travelled three thousand kilometres by bus and car through central and southern Mexico to learn how it’s people understand death. There, sacrificial offerings, cleansing rituals, and elaborate altars in private homes are all a means of discussing one’s passing and connecting with loved ones already gone. The specimens I photographed during my time there serve a similar purpose. They are vessels for contemplation of the afterlife to help us better grasp what lies on the other side. 

 

This is the beginning of a body of work that was photographed at the Museum of Natural History in Puebla, Mexico where I was generously granted access to their immense taxidermy collection.

 

Jaguar, 2015
Horned Deer, 2015